Premises Liability

Who is liable if someone falls on a property owned by an individual or business?

Premises liability holds property owners liable in personal injury cases where the injury was caused by some type of unsafe or defective condition on someone’s property.

What is a premises liability case?

Premises liability is a legal concept that typically means a personal injury case where the injury was caused by some type of unsafe or defective condition on someone’s property. A legal claim for premises liability can be made through a personal injury lawsuit or insurance action, and lets you recover compensation for damages, injury, pain, and suffering or other settlements when someone else is legally responsible for causing an accident or creating the circumstances that led up to your injury.

What is premises liability insurance coverage?

“Premises Liability” or “slip-and-fall” coverage is designed to protect the insured if another person is injured while on your property.

Are you liable if a trespasser gets hurt on your property?

It very rare for a trespasser to successfully sue a property owner for an injury, but it is not impossible if the property owner has been grossly negligent. If someone trespasses on your property and they get hurt, you will most likely not be liable unless malicious intent to harm can be established.

Who is at fault if you fall and are injured or cause damages to someone else’s property?

To be legally responsible for the injuries suffered from slipping or tripping and falling on someone else’s property, there are a few things to consider. Was the owner of the premises or an employee responsible for the spill, worn or torn spot, or other slippery or dangerous surface or item to be underfoot and resulted in the injury to persons or property? Was the individual acting in accordance with the law at the time of injury? If not, was the violation part of the cause for the damages or the injury? Every case is unique and each of these questions will impact the result of a Premise Liability case.